The overwhelming rush of social

As I teach and lead a newsroom at the same time, it’s incredible to think of the number of ways newsrooms can deliver information. When a reporter goes out to a story, we expect him or her to deliver information from a cellphone via Twitter with text, photos and video. We expect a written news story for the web along with possibly additional information and documentation. Then they must get multiple versions of a broadcast story  that may include on air time on the set or from a live location. That is a lot to do for any person who is at any point in a career as a journalist.

It’s so fascinating how I continue to help coordinate and expand the roles of journalists in my newsroom. It’s also led me to expand my attentions. I no longer have one central place (like this site) where I share all of my knowledge. I have Twitter (which I’ve used since October 2006), Facebook (since March 2005), LinkedIn (since April 2006), my Google+ page (which is new), Facebook journalism and blogging groups, my course Facebook page, my course Tumblr, my course blog, and my advocacy site and its many social outlets. (Oh, and I love Instagram.) I juggle all of these resources while encouraging my students to focus on one work brand (KOMU or KBIA) and one personal brand (on a portfolio to help them get a job).

It’s no wonder my brain feels busy all of the time.

With my experimentation of so many different tools, I wouldn’t recommend this mode of sharing. Keep it centralized as you build your identity online. Leave comments and share links of information that come from smart people you want to know and talk to. Write strong blog posts and find others who will be interested in what you have to say. You can’t assume they’ll come to you and learn. If you snag a job that lets you experiment… that’s when things can start to get messy. The important thing is to find ways to report back the lessons you’ve learned. I’m lucky to have a class and a newsroom where I can do that. I also get to share my knowledge in spaces like #wjchat and at local meetings for hacks/hackersIRE.

Of course, there’s this space as well. And it feels good to get back to sharing my knowledge here again.

(Photo courtesy of Aramil Liadon/Flickr)

UPDATE: I guess I should clarify after reading my student Max’s blog post. This is what happens when I dump the thoughts in my head. I juggle a thousand different social media tools for many, many different purposes. When I say focus, I mean focus on yourself, your interests and experiment for yourself (a portfolio and social media energy for yourself) and your career (managing multiple social tools for your workplace) before you start adding all kinds of other projects.

6 comments ↓

#1 Max Walker on 02.07.12 at 8:12 pm

When you say you “wouldn’t recommend this mode of sharing,” to what are you referring?

Is it to experimenting with developing social tools and their potential broadcast applications, or something else?

#2 Jen Reeves on 02.07.12 at 9:10 pm

I wouldn’t recommend using SO many tools at the same time. I’m managing all of the class sites, personal sites, work sites and my mom world stuff at the same time. I wouldn’t recommend that. Experiment away… I just wouldn’t recommend my scattered, deep involvement on so many platforms!

#3 Tshaka Armstrong on 02.08.12 at 12:31 am

You hit the nail on the head… today’s reporters have A LOT on their plates. It’s incredible the juggling, but for those who can handle the load they’re making themselves indispensable in a day and age where those use to the way we did things are often caught like a deer in the headlights.

#4 Max Walker on 02.09.12 at 11:11 pm

I thought a bit more about this, and wrote a response:

http://maxwellwalker4.wordpress.com/2012/02/09/social-outburst/

#5 Jen Reeves on 02.10.12 at 9:42 am

@Max – I updated my post in response to your response! (Isn’t this fun?)

#6 Max Walker on 02.10.12 at 2:57 pm

Definitely. It’s the nerdiest form of tag.

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